The study of Brazilian slavery and abolition has expanded considerably in the last few decades, with important conclusions that develop our understanding of citizenship and freedom. The Boundaries of Freedom is edited by historians Brodwyn Fischer and Keila Grinberg, who have written key works on postabolition citizenship, slavery, and the law. Here they provide in English scholarship from Brazilian historians who usually write in Portuguese. The “Brazilian School” of slavery, central to the study of Atlantic slavery, offers new discussions on geography, land use, identity, subjectivity, family relationships, and the diverse forms of enslavement and work that resulted from Brazil's gradual approach to abolition. The authors illustrate the social, cultural, and political dimensions surrounding gradual abolition and how the periodic reorganizing of slave structures resulted in new “boundaries of freedom” that property owners sought to control and enslaved and formerly enslaved persons to rewrite.

In the United States, Rebecca Scott's...

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