Ryan Pettengill has written a good book about left-led labor activism in Detroit from 1941 to 1956. Beginning in the last years of the Popular Front era, Pettengill focuses on the history of community-based organizing during World War II and the early Cold War years. Communists and their allies worked incredibly hard, building networks among Black and labor activists to push the United Auto Workers (UAW) to create a fair employment practices committee (FEPC), to pressure Detroit's city council to build affordable and desegregated housing options, to demand federal full employment legislation, and to counter the growth of segregationist, white supremacist organizations in Detroit and Michigan, among many other cross-racial efforts. The network that communists and their supporters built weathered the first years of the Cold War and the onslaught of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) investigations and continued well into the mid-1950s, beyond when it is generally understood...

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