It would be easy to argue that the Farm Security Administration (FSA) served the interests of US agribusiness. Through its Farm Labor Camp Program, the agency surveilled, disciplined, and deradicalized diverse agricultural workers during an era of labor militancy. In Migrant Citizenship: Race, Rights, and Reform in the U.S. Farm Labor Camp, Verónica Martínez-Matsuda takes a different approach. Though she acknowledges detrimental aspects of the program, she also takes seriously the FSA's democratic vision. Her book pushes against narratives that center victimization at the expense of agricultural workers’ political and intellectual histories. Migrant Citizenship instead offers a powerful history of aspiration, democracy, and the power of community.

From 1935 to 1946, the FSA built over one hundred agricultural labor camps in rural areas across the nation. The program grew out of the Resettlement Agency (RA), which President Roosevelt created through Executive Order 7027 to pacify southern tenant farmers...

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