Nick Mansfield has produced a series of studies that combine social and military history. His 2016 volume, Soldiers as Workers, was particularly noteworthy in exploring the complexity and tensions of class and soldiering in the nineteenth-century British military. Rejecting what he saw as the superficial accounts of the military in much British social history, Mansfield argued that both officers and rank-and-file soldiers continued to display attitudes and values that were rooted in the social classes from which they were recruited.

Soldiers as Citizens is very much a companion to the earlier book. Mansfield draws on E. P. Thompson's agentic view of class while insisting on the variety of experiences and perspectives that shaped the differences within British working-class identities. Soldiers, Mansfield writes, were “fundamentally working men in uniform” who retained much of their former civilian culture and who were formally as well as socially marked off from their officers,...

You do not currently have access to this content.