To say I am obsessed with food protests is probably an understatement. When I began graduate school in the early 2000s, I read Paula E. Hyman's “Immigrant Women and Consumer Protest: The New York City Kosher Meat Boycott of 1902” and my intellectual curiosity was piqued. I gobbled up any bit of scholarship on food protests I could find—Dana Frank, Annelise Orleck, and Meg Jacobs. But, to be honest, the historiographical pickings were slim. This lacuna, however, has changed significantly in the past decade. With Food Studies now an established discipline and a new generation of scholars committed to examining history through an intersectional lens, the bookshelves are beginning to fill up. And I could not be more excited. In Radical Housewives: Price Wars and Food Politics in Mid-Twentieth-Century Canada, Julie Guard adds to the growing scholarship on food protests and politics. And she does it very well indeed.

Guard...

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