In this wide-ranging account of grassroots organizing in the 1990s, Levenstein argues that US-based women of color and activists from the global South transformed both feminist thought and practice, leading to a transnational movement that embraced all social justice issues as feminist causes. Levenstein's account centers around the catalyzing role of the 1995 United Nations Fourth World Conference on the Status of Women in Beijing, emphasizing how disability rights and queer feminists gained visibility and allies while expanding their organizing networks at the same time that feminist economists and development activists forced the head of the World Bank to meet with them and acknowledge the gendered impact of neoliberal trade and development policies. The culmination of the conference, the Beijing Platform for Action, was “the crowning achievement” of two decades of feminist work through the United Nations, which resulted in shifting consciousness about women's human rights and the recognition by...

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