Writing from inside the Covid-19 lockdown, I figured our readers as much as the editor would relish the summertime reverie afforded by Peter Blair’s witty “Caddy Master.” Would that we all could take a mulligan on this entire season of distress.

Back-to-business and in keeping with the themes of contemporary relevance, we are delighted to showcase Liz Faue and Josiah Rector’s probing and prescient take on women health care workers during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s. As the authors document, a spike of needlestick injuries, accentuated by a breakdown of OSHA and CDC regulatory vigilance, set the stage for concerted pushback by SEIU activists alongside women’s, gay rights, and public health organizations. Their efforts were crowned by the Needlestick Safety and Prevention Act of 2000, which established new, federal standards on blood-borne pathogens. The danger to health care providers identified in HIV care, the authors conclude, is...

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