In Asian Waters: Oceanic Worlds from Yemen to Yokohama is a fantastic, but not overwhelming, introductory text highlighting the interrelationships that are made possible by way of the oceans. From maritime trades, illegal smuggling, slavery, colonization, and neocolonial militant powers, Eric Tagliacozzo is ambitious and adept enough to weave complex spatial and temporal narratives together in simple prose that introduces these kinds of archives, field notes, and scholarly research to almost anyone interested in a compelling sociohistorical story. Yet he also does not underestimate his audience. The stories flow from one connection to the next—“power; trade; the oscillation of empires; diaspora; and religion-in-transit” (16)—in dizzying speed, perhaps a litmus test for the reader to gauge how far their interests (and stamina) will carry them to follow the book's main arguments and Tagliacozzo's own zeal to squeeze a significant amount of history in five hundred pages. However, where the book thrives...

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