As its preface helpfully summarizes, Remaindered Life “retells the story of the global capitalist present” generally told as a story of an agential Global North whose effects ripple to the Global South, by “recast[ing] the global present as instead the aftermath and continuing effects of unfinished movements of decolonization against an extant imperial relation of dispossession that serves up enabling milieus for the labor-capital relation” (x). Decentering the traditional centers of analyses of capitalism, Tadiar allows us to see Marxian categories of labor and value as operating with relation to “waste” and, in particular, a “wasted” life, or a life deemed not worth living. She theorizes how contemporary global capitalism thrives on relegating much of humanity as precisely “not human” or always just “becoming-human”; the great classes here are not the laboring versus the capitalist but rather those whose lives are deemed to be human and those whose lives are...

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