In The Globally Familiar, Ethiraj Gabriel Dattatreyan presents a close reading of his ethnographic work to argue that young men in Delhi both consume and produce hip hop to create meaningful relationships across lines of difference and to imagine possibilities for their economic mobility, gendered subjectivity, and spatialized presence that would otherwise be unavailable to them, and in ways that “productively disrupted normative understandings of twenty-first-century Delhi's social order” (p. 6). Dattatreyan defines his central term, “the globally familiar,” as “a feeling of connectedness made possible through media-enabled participation and practice and the affective economy and structure of aspiration this feeling produces. It suggests that by cultivating the self through the consumption, production, and circulation of transnational popular culture, a different present and future, replete with unanticipated participation and opportunity, is possible” (p. 3). More specifically, the popular culture referenced through the globally familiar “is Black American masculinity as...

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