Nomadic Pastoralism among the Mongol Herders makes an important contribution to the body of scholarship on the study of nomadic pastoralism, specifically that of Mongol herders. The book explores the dynamic social relationships that are fostered between humans, animals, and the environment in pastoral communities on the two sides of the Mongolian-Russian border. The book would appeal to Inner Asian studies scholars broadly and scholars interested in pastoral societies more specifically.

I situate this review in the context of my own theoretical approach to nomadism. I have written in the areas of nomadism in Mongolia and critiqued the ways in which the lure of the extraordinary constructs and perpetuates the myth of nomads. In my own book, I argue that herders in Mongolia serve as props for the voyeuristic gaze of scholars, travelers, and visitors to Mongolia as a way to perpetuate this myth.1 Anthropology as a discipline was...

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