This vivid anthropological monograph is about the life stories of the authors’ friends, which illustrate the transitional social changes taking place in the urban settlements of Mongolia (Ulaanbaatar, Darkhan, and Erdenet cities) between 1995 and 2010. Lars Højer and Morten Axel Pedersen theorize “urban hunting” as a sui generis social practice that does not fit into preexisting theories of human agency and social practice. They argue that the concept of the “urban hunter” discussed in the book differs from conventional forms of hunting and previous descriptions of urban hustling because, for them, it gives purpose and meaning to the action of “waiting.” In their view, to be an urban hunter in Mongolia requires concentration, endurance, and patience, instead of just being practical in an anticipatory, pessimistic, and risk-averse way. Højer and Pedersen ground their argument in Rane Willerslev's notion of huntsmanship,1 in which “the dreaming self, far from taking...

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