Nancy L. Green's The Limits of Transnationalism is a historical study that tests the theories of, and assumptions around, transnationalism. Green argues that the recent fascination with transnationalism is associated not only with the late twentieth-century political and economic climate but also with poststructuralism. Her driving question is to what extent the celebration of “flexibility, mobility, and individual agency” (p. 4) may have overshadowed the restrictive side of international movement.

The first chapter narrates a fabulous story of one Frank Gueydan from Louisiana and Texas, who went to France—his father's birthplace—married, and became a winemaker named François Gueydan de Roussel. By 1907, he was facing a bewildering array of legal problems, accused of manufacturing artificial wine during a period known as the “Great Wine Revolt” (p. 15). After fleeing to Switzerland, Gueydan de Roussel undertook a decades-long campaign seeking to exonerate himself through copious correspondence and publications. He appealed to...

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