Daniel Burnham's tenure in the Philippines lasted only forty days, yet the Chicago architect has become a staple name in US colonial state building projects in the archipelago. In Cities and Nationhood, Ian Morley reinterrogates Burnham's City Beautiful plan and examines the transplantation and legacy of American city designs in the making and remaking of Philippine landscapes. As with other colonial projects in the country, urban planning and development were buttressed by the polemics of US imperialism. Morley contends that architectural projects, along with political training and public education, were at the core of US benevolent assimilation. The book, however, moves further in evaluating Burnham's designs beyond the colonial agenda of imposing presence and control by proposing that urban projects provided a visible sense of belonging and identity to the nascent Filipino nation. The colonial urban designs, Morley argues, were embedded with American-crafted Filipino nationalism, creating and orienting edifices...

You do not currently have access to this content.