The anthropology of Indian Christianity has a very long history. The European missionaries who brought Christianity to India beginning in the sixteenth century were, arguably, the first to make an ethnographic object of Indian religion, dividing their attention between the complex assemblage of practices, beliefs, and institutions that came to be known as “Hinduism” and converts’ invariably localized forms of the Christian faith. Given the field's entanglement with colonial and missionary interests, scholars of Indian Christianity have long struggled to arrive at an appropriate degree of distance from their subject matter. Two recent books aptly represent the vitality of current scholarship in the anthropology of Christianity in India, showcasing the insights gained when scholars abandon the quiet judgments about whether it is “good” or not that Christianity has taken root in India, and focus on the lives of Indian Christians and their complex social worlds. Neither of these books shrinks...

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