Concerns over health and gender have consistently been interwoven into modern nation-building projects in East Asia from as early as the late nineteenth century. In Gender, Health, and History in Modern East Asia, editors Angela Ki Che Leung and Izumi Nakayama bring these strands into dialogue to show the various ways that state concerns over health in China, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, and Taiwan have been articulated through efforts to control reproduction, optimize sexual hygiene, assign gendered identities, and promote men's economic productivity. Across nine chapters and an introduction by Francesca Bray, this volume sheds new light on the ways that intraregional exchanges and experiences have led to shared ideas about gender, sexuality, and biological and reproductive health, thereby emphasizing the need to combine science studies with a broader regional focus on East Asia as a whole.

The volume is divided into three sections. The first, “Bodies Beyond...

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