Although this edited collection’s title highlights the broad focus on “Muslim cultures,” the introduction reflects on the challenges of “studying sex practices in the Middle East” (1). Aymon Kreil, Lucia Sorbera, and Serena Tolino set out to address the “epistemic challenges facing empirical approaches to gender normativity in the Middle East” by focusing on four key sociological premises: the fluctuating hierarchies producing norms, the variety of intersecting authority sources on gender and sexuality, the manifold settings in which people do not seek conformity with prevailing norms without openly challenging them, and the scholarly limitations to providing complete accounts of experiences of sexuality. Based on these foundations, the volume includes eleven chapters divided into three parts: the first focuses on premodern and early modern Arab and Islamic sources, the second discusses modern and contemporary productions, and the third takes an ethnographic approach to explore the lived realities of subjects across different...

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