Marriage and family are not private institutions and have long been subject to state regulation and control. State policies and laws govern both institutions, blurring the private/public binary. These patriarchal policies, in turn, discriminate against women and limit their rights. In Iran and elsewhere in the Middle East, marriage, divorce, and inheritance are domains in which women remain subordinate to men, and their sexual and reproductive rights are particularly restricted. Iranian Romance in the Digital Age examines the evolution of the institutions of marriage and family and heterosexual intimacy in postrevolutionary Iran. The book’s significance lies in its attempt to explore Iranian heterosexual marriage, family, and romance through an interdisciplinary lens; these disciplines include ethnography, medical anthropology, sociology, history, and feminist research.

Women’s narratives and experiences of romance and marriage take a central stage in the edited volume. The book provides a glimpse of women’s everyday life under the Islamic...

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