Neill Macaulay, who died in late October 2007 at his home in Micanopy, Florida, arrived at the profession of Latin American historian by a somewhat unconventional course. After undergraduate study at The Citadel in his native South Carolina, he served in the United States Army in postwar Korea and then, after a brief intermission, took up service with the Rebel Army of Fidel Castro in Cuba. He was not moved to do so for reasons of Marxist or any other ideology, but he felt a genuine sympathy for the long-neglected Cuban peasantry and felt that his own training could be put to good use on their behalf; neither did he deny that the possibilities for fame and fortune entered into his decision. Macaulay arrived, however, in time to fight only in the final phase of the Cuban Revolution. He then stayed on for slightly over a year after Castro’s victory,...

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