Nicholas de Villiers's Cruisy, Sleepy, Melancholy: Sexual Disorientation in the Films of Tsai Ming-liang offers a rich, kaleidoscopic reading of the filmmaker's oeuvre. The primary readings that de Villiers gives throughout the book advance a notion of “sexual disorientation,” which he grounds in the ways that Tsai's films center an “affective charge of space and sexuality.” Although a crucial focus rests on how, as de Villiers suggests, Tsai's films prioritize an “unfixing” of binaries between heterosexuality and homosexuality, de Villiers shows that this unfixing of sexual binaries allows for other binaries to dissolve, including that of genre categories and of regionally specific filmic vocabularies and their critical discourses. While de Villiers sets Sara Ahmed, Kevin Moon, and, to an extent, José Muñoz as his primary interlocutors with respect to theoretical framings, the book also serves as a comprehensive survey of academic scholarship on Tsai's work. For any film theory class...

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